Home Run
Benchmarking / Good Practices / Contact Us / See Sample Dashboard

Français

Login

Welcome, XYZ Co‑op, to your Benchmarking Dashboard

This dashboard looks at how well our sample co‑op is doing, and where it could do better. These results are for an Ontario co‑op with 100 suburban units, compared with peer groups chosen by the Agency.

The measures are broken down into four categories:

• Managing the Property    • Managing the Expenses    • Financial Ratios    • Managing the Revenue   

Scoring System

4 icons in the top 15%
3 icons above the median
2 icons below the median
1 icon in the bottom 15%

See your co‑op’s performance on a scale of one to four houses:

  • Four houses (a home run!) puts the co‑op in the top 15% of its peers
  • Three and two houses represent middle-of-the-road performance, a bit better (3 houses) or a bit worse (2 houses)
  • One house puts the co‑op in the bottom 15%

For most measures, the co‑op’s performance is compared to co‑ops in the specified peer group. For one measure – the Overall Capital Reserve Management Score - houses are awarded based on meeting specific standards set by the Agency.

A Caution about Comparisons

Comparing one co‑op with another can be helpful, but will not give the whole truth. You will need to bring your own judgment and knowledge about your co‑op’s circumstances to bear in assessing benchmark performance.

To get the most out of the benchmarking process, think about the peer group you want to be compared to. Your peer group options are:

  • All Agency co‑ops
  • Co‑ops in your province
  • Co‑ops in your city

If you decide that you would like to compare all of the measures to one of these groups, click on the check box next to “Apply change to all measures”. This option will also work if you select a custom peer group.

Measures for Managing the Property

1 icons

Capital Replacement Reserve Contribution per Unit

Compared to:      

This is the amount your co‑op added last year to your capital replacement reserve for future replacement of major parts of your building. The amount your co‑op puts aside annually is ideally based on its long-term capital replacement plan.

 

2 icons

Capital Reserve Replenishment Ratio

Compared to:      

This measure shows the ratio between what your co‑op has added to its capital reserve fund and the amount it spent from the reserve during the past three years. A replenishment ratio greater than 1 means you are putting in more money than you are taking out; a replenishment ratio of less than 1 means you are spending your reserves faster than you are building them up.

 

0 icons

Overall Capital Reserve Management Score

This score gives you an overall rating for the way you are managing your capital reserve. To earn three houses, your co‑op needs an Agency-approved capital replacement plan; a capital reserve replenishment rate of more than 1.1, owing to net additions to the reserve over the past three years (see your replenishment ratio benchmark); and annual contributions that reflect your buildings' value (this is the guaranteed replacement value assessed by your insurer).

 

3 icons

Maintenance Spending per Unit

Compared to:      

We treat high maintenance expenses as good — they show you are looking after your buildings. But what if these expenses are high because you didn't fix minor problems early, or because you can't afford to replace worn-out components? You will need to think about what this measure says about your co‑op.

 

4 icons

Maintenance Spending as a Percentage of Total Expenses

Compared to:      

We treat high maintenance expenses as good — they mean you are looking after your buildings. But what if these expenses are high because you didn't fix minor problems early or can't afford to replace worn-out components? You will need to think about what this measure says about your co‑op.

 

Measures for Managing the Expenses

1 icons

Administration Spending per Unit

Compared to:      

Spending on administration is best assessed in combination with business performance results. See how you are doing on vacancy loss and arrears and bad debts. These are some of the administrative stress points that will tell you if your money is well spent.

 

1 icons

Administration Spending as a Percentage of Total Expenses

Compared to:      

Spending on administration is best assessed in combination with business performance results. See how you are doing on vacancy loss and arrears and bad debts. These are some of the administrative stress points that will tell you if your money is well spent.

 

3 icons

Audit Fees per Unit

Compared to:      

Keep in mind that audit costs have been increasing as new accounting standards add to the procedures that auditors have to carry out. If you find your audit fees to be on the high side, talk to your auditor about what you can do to reduce the cost and consider doing a request for proposals to test the market.

 

4 icons

Insurance Costs per Unit

Compared to:      

Insurance rates depend in part on the claims your co‑op has made in the past. You can take some control over your premiums by eliminating hazards and ensuring that your members have their own content and liability insurance.

 

Financial Ratios

2 icons

Liquidity Ratio

Compared to:      

The Liquidity Ratio measures how much money your co‑op has available to cover its major bills. It compares your co‑op's non-negotiable expenses each month (mortgage, taxes, and utilities) to the money readily available to your co‑op in cash and investments. If you have more than five months' expenses on hand, the Agency rates your liquidity as Good, and more than eight months' expenses as Excellent.

 

1 icons

Net-Income Ratio

Compared to:      

Is your co‑op earning enough to pay its mortgage and operating costs and contribute properly to its replacement reserve? See your net operating income shown as a percentage of the replacement cost of your building (income minus operating expenses, not including mortgage payments or capital-reserve contributions). A net-income ratio between 0.75% and 1% is ideal.

 

Measures for Managing the Revenue

3 icons

Arrears and Bad Debts

Compared to:      

This is the percentage of your housing charges you lost to arrears and bad debts. The best-run co‑ops keep this number very close to zero.

 

2 icons

Vacancy Loss

Compared to:      

This is the percentage of your housing charges you lost because of vacancies. By retaining satisfied members and filling vacancies promptly, the best-run co‑ops keep their vacancy losses to a minimum.

 

2 icons

Annual Change in Gross Housing Charges

Compared to:      

See the percentage increase in housing charges since the previous year. Your co‑op needs an annual housing charge increase to maintain its buildings and put aside funds in its reserves for the future. Are you increasing housing charges to keep up with rising expenses?

 

3 icons

Laundry Revenue per Unit

Compared to:      

It's easy to forget that, besides charges for leasing machines, your co‑op is paying for the water and utilities they use. If you own the machines, you are also paying for maintenance. Are you charging enough to cover your costs?

 

3 icons

Parking Revenue per Unit

Compared to:      

This measure shows your co‑op's revenue from parking in dollars per unit. If you have a parking lot or garage, does your co‑op charge fairly for the space? As some members do not have a car, they do not benefit from the parking and may not want to subsidize it.